Phase II:  Kauhale Ke Kuleana (the Responsibility of the Whole Village)

Phase II:  Kauhale Ke Kuleana (the Responsibility of the Whole Village)

Phase II:  Kauhale Ke Kuleana (the Responsibility of the Whole Village)

Phase II:  Kauhale Ke Kuleana (the Responsibility of the Whole Village) – Strengthening Kapiolani’s Campus and Culture for Student Success

The University of Hawaii – Kapiolani Community College (KapCC) is the largest two-year institution in the Honolulu urban area, serving nearly 7,994 students in fall 2014; of which 1,326 (16.6%) are Native Hawaiians.  Native Hawaiians have lower persistence (fall-to-fall), transfer and graduation rates in comparison with all students.  KapCC’s project is a Phase II to its Title III Part F renovation project, which establishes the physical infrastructure through targeted renovations to provide an environment conducive for student success.  Title III Part A investment will provide the necessary funding to create a campus culture of success which advances research-based high impact student support and teaching practices, improved evaluation systems, and fiscal stability.  Coupled with the Title III Part F renovations, this Title III Part A project directly addresses Native Hawaiian student achievement gaps in persistence, transfer, and graduation rates through one activity – Increasing Native Hawaiian Student’s Access to Success – thereby employing strategies which will increase the success, progression, degree completion and transfer rates of full-time college students.  The project will provide highly structured pathways for students to advance from basic skills to an associate degree and/or transfer.  The activity will address 4 institutional goals and 24 performance measures through 3 major component objectives:

 

  • Objective 1 – Improve Academic Program Support for Native Hawaiian Students: Strategies to strengthen academic program support to assist in persistence, transfer, and/or graduation within three years. Programs: Develop, implement, assess, and improve research-based high impact student support and teaching practices to: 1) achieve strategic institutional goals and performance measures identified above; 2) reduce achievement gaps for Native Hawaiian students; 3) strengthen student engagement as measured by CCSSE; and 4) strengthen student learning as measured by qualitative and quantitative methods.
  • Objective 2 – Improve Student Support Services for Native Hawaiian Students (Addresses Competitive Priority 1&2): Strengthen assessment, evaluation, and improvement systems to: 1) better manage course, program, and institutional learning outcomes assessment and deepen student learning; and 2) improve cohort tracking of student progress from entry, through first and second years, transfer to UH 4-year campuses,  jobs and careers by sector (private, public, non-profit); and integrate new measures  into three year Comprehensive Program Review and Institutional Effectiveness Measures to guide budget and resource allocation.
  • Objective 3 – Improve Fiscal Stability and Capacity: 1) increasing tuition and fee revenue through enrollment management strategies more sharply focused on student success and persistence to completion, transfer, employment, and community engagement; 2) improving grants management and business office functions.

This project addresses the Absolute Priority, meets both Competitive Preference Priorities, and the Invitational Priority.  We will improve student support services through professional development of current faculty, counselors, and staff, and hire new personnel to focus on academic pathways, access to financial aid, career exploration and professional development for Native Hawaiian students.  The project will strengthen Native Hawaiian language preservation and revitalization by developing a Hawaiian 290 course – Hawaiian Language and Culture through Application – which will prepare students to serve as Hawaiian language and culture resources as interpreters on campus and in the community through volunteer experiences.  Ultimately, we seek to close and eliminate achievement gaps and better prepare Native Hawaiian students for productive persistence to transfer and career opportunities.

Parent: Abstracts

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